Innovative Hydrogen-powered Car Created

Lead researcher Dirk Kok toasts the fuel of the future – water. (Credit: Image courtesy of University of Sunderland)
ScienceDaily (Sep. 17, 2008) — As the price of gasoline fuel soars, and concerns grow about the impact of car culture on the environment, a team of scientists from the University of Sunderland have come up with a hydrogen-powered car, which they believe is a significant step forward in creating a mass-produced green machine.

The team, led by Dirk Kok from the Institute of Automotive and Manufacturing Advanced Practice (AMAP), in partnership with the Centre for Process Innovation at Wilton and Lambda One Autogas at Gateshead, have successfully adapted a Nissan Almera to run on hydrogen so that it only emits water from its exhaust.

The HyPower Nissan Almera will be unveiled at the Partners4Automotive 2008 conference on September 17 at the University of Sunderland’s Sir Tom Cowie Campus. This international event will look at alternative fuel technologies for vehicles and transport systems, giving local business the chance to see cutting edge developments from around the world.

Adrian Morris, Operations Manager at AMAP, says the HyPower project is a major breakthrough in the development of green transport. He says: “This project marks a significant step forwards in our understanding of hydrogen as a fuel for the automotive industry.”

“This vehicle will act as a test bed to evaluate novel hydrogen technologies in vehicles and will enhance the region’s status as an important automotive research and development centre.”

Dirk Kok says: “The whole subject of hydrogen as a fuel for cars is intriguing. It all depends upon the price of oil, the driving range of these new green vehicles, ease of safely filling these vehicles, and the availability of competing systems, which we are also researching.

“The HyPower project does demonstrate that hydrogen is a practical and environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels. But though this is a significant step forward, there is still a long way to go before we see these vehicles driving about our roads.”

Adapted from materials provided by University of Sunderland.

Source : sciencedaily.com

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